Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Culture, Denmark, Expat life, Travel

Glyptoteket, Copenhagen

This is the first museum I’ve visited since moving to Copenhagen, and it was definitely a good one to start with. It features the personal collection of Carl Jacobsen (son of Carlsberg Breweries’ founder) and contains a large selection of ancient Mediterranean sculptures, as well as French impressionist paintings. The building itself is quite lovely. It’s got a lush tropical indoor courtyard, for one, and lots of skylights leading the way up to a rooftop terrace with an entertaining view of Tivoli amusement park rollercoasters (you can see people getting flung in all directions).

Also, in case any of you plan a trip to Copenhagen or this museum in the future – it seems like there is free entry on Tuesdays so you may want to double check for that πŸ™‚

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Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Culture, Denmark, Expat life, Home, Travel

Botanical Garden, University of Copenhagen

Another Giverny post? No, this time I’m sharing some photos from here in Denmark, from my university’s botanical garden. It’s no Monet’s garden, but it’s got a charm of its own. It makes for an idyllic walk, and there’s plenty of interesting plants to observe on the way (many I hadn’t seen before!) as you will see in the photos.

The gardens are in a very central location, right next to Rosenborg Castle, and very close to my workplace. It’s free to walk around the gardens, but you have to pay to go into the greenhouses. Pity I don’t go for lunchtime walks here more often.

Even though my workplace is in the heart of Copenhagen, I haven’t felt particularly compelled to wander into town during or after work. Once I’m at work I feel busy! But looking back on these pictures, I’m thinking it would be really nice to read here or catch some rays on warm summer days every now and again.

Hope you enjoyed these photos!

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Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Culture, Denmark, Travel

The Black Diamond, Copenhagen

First things first. What is The Black Diamond? It’s this onyx-like structure which is an extension of the Royal Danish Library. Take a look below.

It’s got some nice views facing the waterfront:

When you face away from the water, you face the Danish War Museum which is just across the road from The Black Diamond.

Do keep scrolling, because the coolest features of this building are yet to come.

Inside this building is a massive open hall that reaches all the way up…
And up…
And up.
This photo kind of looks like one of those impossible M.C. Escher illusions to me, ha
Really liked all the interesting views from each floor of this place.
The views by the water cycling back out weren’t too bad either.
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Bristol, Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark, Travel

Harbourside – Copenhagen edition

To those of you who have been reading my blog from the beginning (or my friends in Bristol, ha), you already know my favourite thing about living in Bristol, UK, was access to the lovely Harbourside. It’s where I’ve spent much of my time and taken many a walk to contemplate, have deep chats with friends, check out the CARGO eateries, and get sunburnt in the summers. By the way, Bristol recently made national headlines when the Colston statue was dumped in the harbour during the recent BLM protest – a huge moment given Bristol’s maritime history.

Anyway, it pleases me greatly that there’s plenty of that Harbourside living in Copenhagen. I’ve only just begun exploring around Islands Brygge/Sydhavnen. There’s a lot of hanging out and swimming in these areas, plenty of modern buildings, and pedestrian paths by the water are very clean and well-kept.

Have a lovely day πŸ™‚

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Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark, Expat life, Travel

Valbyparken, Copenhagen

Goodness, this place was an amazing surprise. A big green park a mere 20 minute cycle ride from home, and with a beach? In the city? Yes and yes.

My cycle going there and back wasn’t very pretty – it was a hot sunny day, I’m very road-shy, I had no idea where I was going and had to stop and check my map every 2 minutes. I also haven’t quite perfected my cool cycle chic look. Regardless, I would definitely brave the trip again to revisit this park.

I’m guessing these are poplar trees?
Either way this long path lined with trees is a distinctive entry point into the park, and very nice to cycle down.
Loved the little peeks of water through the trees.
Plenty of folks windsurfing at this place!
It was an almost blindingly bright day.
I skipped on a few stones by the water πŸ™‚
I can’t say I’ve ever seen people windsurf before, but it looks fun!
Clear water at the beach.
Just beautiful, isn’t it?
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Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Culture, Denmark, Expat life, Travel

Reffen, Copenhagen

This post is going to be super visual and truly drool-worthy…consider yourself warned!

The weather forecast wasn’t looking great, but my friend and I were determined to visit Reffen, a food market set up like a little village on the other side of the water from Copenhagen city centre. Thankfully it didn’t rain on the day we visited – we even caught a bit of sun. It’s a short trip up with the bike/bus/water taxi from town – we went with the water taxi, which would be a great option for a sunny day.

To my knowledge, this place is one of the few Street food markets in Copenhagen (apart from the fancy Torvehallerne by NΓΈrreport, which is dangerously close to my workplace…) As someone who used to work in a food stall in multiple food markets back in the UK, I’m a little surprised that there aren’t more of them in the capital here in Denmark. But I’m not complaining – the selection is good.

Reffen has a bit of a grungy vibe with lots of containers around…kind of reminds me of the Cargo project in Bristol (my favourite Harbourside eating area in Bristol basically)
This photo says it all – everything is contactless and there are reminders everywhere to keep up hygiene.
I definitely don’t need to be told twice to get ice cream. The ice cream shop is called “BadHabits” by the way – very fitting.
Honestly, the ice cream here was really good.
Outdoor stalls and seating around the food “village.”
Love how colourful everything is!
More food, more containers…
Cute outdoor dining area right next to the water.
How very Danish πŸ™‚ I did mention in a previous post how difficult it is to take photos here without some kind of a bike in it, did I not?
Now for some food! That’s freshly grated truffle – cost me an arm but it was worth it.
So many options…
There’s also some cute shops around that aren’t food stalls.
Me being an embarrassing tourist.
Hope you’re not too hungry after reading this, ha.
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Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Culture, Denmark, Home, Travel

Fredriks Kirke/Amalienborg, Copenhagen

This is another very photogenic area in Copenhagen at golden hour. What I just love about this place is that if you look one way from Amalienborg Slotsplads (the courtyard of the Royal residences) you get a majestic view of the rococo-style “Marble Church” Marmorkirken/Fredriks Kirke; if you look the other way, you get a view of the water and the very modern looking Copenhagen Opera House (Operaen) which was built less than 20 years ago. The opera house was built in alignment with Amalienborg. Take a look below.

Hope you’re all well.

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Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark, Expat life, Travel

Sundown in Nyhavn, Copenhagen

Yesterday evening I met up with a fellow photographer/hobbyist to take a couple of shots around town for golden hour. I can’t emphasise enough the fact that Copenhagen on a summer evening is definitely the place to be. The vibes are good: there’s food, there’s music, and the sun takes forever to set. I’ll leave you with some shots from the iconic Nyhavn harbour (which was relatively uncrowded thankfully – not so keen on the place when there’s big crowds)

The promenade down the harbour
Just look at these sun-soaked houses!
I adore all the colourful buildings around Copenhagen – they are everywhere.
Rainbow promenade.
Crossing…
How adorable is this outdoor dining set-up?
I think it’s pretty much impossible to get a shot in the city without bicycles making an appearance πŸ™‚
Shimmering sunset reflected on the windows.
And some more bikes πŸ™‚
And finally a photo with the water πŸ™‚

Hope you enjoyed this photo-heavy post, have a great weekend πŸ™‚

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Copenhagen, Denmark, Expat life, Personal, Travel, Uncategorized

My (very emotional) experience flying from the UK and into Denmark during Covid-19 restrictions

As I’ve mentioned in a previous post, I’ve been trying to fly to Copenhagen both because of my new job offer there and because my visa in the UK is about to expire. After several canceled flights with British Airways, I managed to book a route with Lufthansa which would take me from LHR (Heathrow) to FRA (Frankfurt) and finally to CPH (Copenhagen). I got up real early the morning of the 20th May – around 4.00 am – to catch my flight at London Heathrow.

As I was getting ready and gathering all my luggage I had a moment of dizziness – like of an existential kind. It suddenly hit me that I’m doing this all alone and that nobody was about to hold my hand and tell me everything will be ok. I’m about to self deport from a country I’ve lived in for almost 10 years and fly straight into a country I’ve never lived in before (and one with ongoing border closures no less). I’m leaving all my friends in the UK behind, and they wouldn’t even be able to visit me (for a good while anyway). My family are on the other side of the world and it will be a while until we reunite too. All this in the middle of a global pandemic. What if something goes wrong? What if I get stranded? It’s a lot of uncertainty. Obviously these were thoughts I had all along, but I guess in the lockdown state coronavirus has a way of making everything seem as if its on hold indefinitely, suspended in time, and really far away somehow. So I hadn’t quite grasped that what I was about to do, and had been meticulously planning for months to do (that is, to leave the UK and open a completely new chapter in life in Denmark), would actually happen. Like right now.

I’ve probably had two comparable moments of existential dizziness in my life – the first time was when I moved to Vienna as a child, with absolutely no knowledge of German or English. I was enrolled in an international school, and on the first day of school I begged my mom not to leave me in that strange environment – full of people speaking a strange language I didn’t understand (English, haha). I felt completely vulnerable, completely helpless, completely alone, and unable to communicate with either my peers or my teachers. Of course, after the terror of being dropped off on my first day of school in Vienna I never looked back. I made friends from every corner of the planet. I also didn’t just get good at English. I practically became a native English speaker within the same year. The person I became as a result of all those experiences led then to the second dizziness – the day I moved to the UK to study by myself at the age of 18 with nothing but a suitcase and a head full of dreams. I wasn’t sure what would actually come out of it in the end – only that I was going ahead with with the move regardless.

And here I am now, three degrees later and a lifetime’s worth of ups and downs to remember the years by. Needless to say, a lot really has happened in my life in the UK. Hell, I was set on getting permanent residency in the UK for the longest time, a ‘dream’ that I only recently gave up. The decision to go to Denmark only entered the picture, well, around the time I got the job in Copenhagen – right as coronavirus started rapidly spreading around Europe. It’s surreal to be uprooted and thrust back into the nebulosity of potentials.

Anyway – I sat quietly for a few minutes to compose my thoughts and emotions. Then I was off to the airport. A generous friend of mine drove me there, which was a lovely send off. I can’t imagine how people who need to do essential international travel actually get around these days without help – coach services to the airport are still not running and trains are a nightmare, not to mention expensive!

[The most beautiful sunrise ever keeps me awake for the journey.]

When I arrive at Heathrow airport, it’s very quiet. Everything seems a bit muffled. Facemasks are handed out at the entrance and there are signs everywhere reminding people to keep a minimum 2m distance from each other. Check-in was easy. I got asked if I live in Copenhagen. I said I “will” live there. I mean, my will to live there after all has been the one the thing that has dominated my life for the past couple of months.

[Quiet morning at Heathrow airport.]

I’m somehow surprised that my flight is still running and on time. Like, I’m so shocked about it that I feel like I’m in a dream or movie. Could it really all be going ahead this smoothly?

[Um…]

I can’t say I felt particularly comfortable on the flight leg from LHR to FRA. It was a fully booked flight and we were packed in like sardines. No social distancing measures whatsoever. I was surrounded by passengers on all sides. It felt more or less like a “normal” flight, except for the requirement that everybody wear a facemask for the duration of the journey.

We land in FRA even earlier than anticipated. I pass German border control (again dealing with the awkward “So do you or do you not live in Denmark?” questions) and even manage to do an hour or so of work.

[Waiting in Frankfurt – limited seating due to social distancing protocols.]

Then, finally, boarding for the FRA to CPH leg of the trip is announced. I still can’t quite believe it’s not cancelled or delayed.

[Pretty sure that’s the bridge between Copenhagen and MalmΓΆ.]

The pilot announces our imminent arrival in CPH. I look out the window. Sunny and blue. I think I start crying uncontrollably at this point – actual tears of joy. I didn’t dare to look at the passenger sat next to me and their reaction to my apparently random burst of tears.

I really bent over backwards to make this happen, after many sleepless nights wondering if my job offer was at risk due to Covid-19, what would happen to me if I overstayed my UK visa, ad infinitum. And in the end, I made it!

[It was a particularly sunny day :)]

The rest of my journey went really smoothly – no delays picking up my luggage. I had a folder full of official documents to show the immigration officers, but passing border control barely took a minute. They asked me why I’m entering Denmark. They then quickly checked over my work permit, work contract, and housing contract before waving me through. All in all, everything went as well as it possibly could!

[Copenhagen Central Station]

The train from the airport to the central station barely took 20 minutes and there was plenty of space in the carriages. When I arrived at the station I was greeted by fresh air, sunlight, and happy vibes all around – it was only a couple of days ago that Denmark opened up shops and started coming out of lockdown. Of course I had to try my best to avoid people and hurry straight to my new apartment, but even that short walk to my place was lovely!

And so begins my life in Copenhagen πŸ™‚

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Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark, Expat life, Personal

Alive and quarantined…in Denmark

(featured photo is the last sunset I saw in Bristol – beautiful isn’t it?)

After 13 hours of transit from Bristol, to London, to Frankfurt, and finally to Copenhagen Airport – getting around by car, plane, train, and foot – I’ve now made it to my new apartment in Copenhagen. Lugging around two bulky suitcases and a backpack while dodging pedestrians like an awkward tourist in a sunny, beautiful city just coming out of lockdown was not a glamorous look. But I’m just so grateful my moving here to Copenhagen went so smoothly – it’s exactly what I’ve been trying to make happen for the past couple of months.

Since the Danish government asks incoming travellers to self-isolate for a couple of weeks, I’ll use that time to catch up on work that I’ve neglected in all the stress of moving. I’ve already got my work desk set up. Maybe I’ll even get some rest here and there, ha. I will also be posting some content here, starting with the story of my trip from the UK to Denmark (which will be up after this post)! I’ve got some past travel memories that I would love to share with you as well, so make sure you stick around and follow the blog πŸ™‚

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